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ENV 800 ELEMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL SAFETY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES 3 Credit Hours

An introduction to safety in the general work environment with emphasis on selected OSHA safety regulations, human costs of injuries, safety programs and management, field trip work observations, risk assessment, hazard/risk communications. No previous experience or coursework in safety is required.

Prerequisite:  ENV 892 or equivalent introductory environmental health sciences course; permission of instructor.

Cross List: CPH 590

Typically Offered: SPRING

ENV 804 HUMAN FACTORS&ERGONOMC 3 Credit Hours

An introduction to fundamental concepts of physical work, human abilities and capabilities (ergonomics) including psychological and cognitive aspects of human work performance (human factors) for the reduction of occupational injuries and illnesses, reduced costs, productivity improvement, worker well-being and longevity, quality of work life, and job satisfaction.

Prerequisite:  Graduate student status in health sciences or related discipline and permission of instructor.

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 810 PRINCIPLES OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to allow students to develop an understanding of human health outcomes associated from environmental and occupational exposures. Students will learn how key issues in environmental health and environmental and occupational medicine are approached from a public health perspective.

Prerequisite:  ENV 892 or equivalent introductory environmental health sciences course; permission of instructor.Crosslist CPH 593

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 811 AGRICULTURAL HEALTH ANDSAFETY 3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to provide basic information and skills to enable health care and safety professional to function in the anticipation, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of occupational illnesses and injuries in the farm community.Crosslist CPH 511.

Typically Offered: SUMMER

ENV 816 ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT 3 Credit Hours

The course will allow students to develop their understanding and knowledge of exposure assessment methods and their application to substantive issues in occupational and environmental health. The course emphasizes methodological principles and good practice, and highlights the many similarities and some interesting differences between occupational and environmental health.

Prerequisite:  ENV 892 or equivalent introductory environmental health sciences course; BIOS 806 or equivalent introductory biostatistics course; permission of instructor.Cross-listed as CPH 594

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 888 PRINCIPLES TOXICOLOGY 3 Credit Hours

An introduction to the principles and methods that are used to determine whether an adverse effect is a result of exposure to a specific agent. A primary purpose of toxicology is to predict human toxicity and human health risk assessment relies heavily on toxicological data obtained from animal studies. This course covers basic mechanisms of toxicity as they pertain to whole organisms, organ systems, and specific toxic agents.

Cross List: CPH 597

Typically Offered: SPRING

ENV 892 PUB HLTH ENVIRONMNT/SO 3 Credit Hours

An introduction to environmental factors (including biological, physical and chemical factors) that affect the health of a community. The main focus will be the effects of exposures that have been associated with human health and environmental problems in the Midwest, specifically water and air pollutants related to animal feeding operations, arsenic in ground water, pesticides, herbicides, lead and radiation. The effects of global warming, ergonomic problems in the meat packing industry and occupational and environmental problems in health care will also be discussed.

Cross List: CPH 503

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 896 RSCH OTHER THAN THESIS 1-9 Credit Hours

This course is for more advanced student research that is clearly distinct from ongoing or planned dissertation work.

Typically Offered: FALL/SP/SU

ENV 898 SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 Credit Hours

A course designed for Masters students that focuses on selected topics or problems in Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health.Crosslist CPH 619

Typically Offered: FALL/SP/SU

ENV 902 DOCTORAL SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4 Credit Hours

A course designed for PhD students in Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health and other graduate students that focuses on selected topics or problems in Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health. ¿

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.

Typically Offered: FALL/SP/SU

ENV 903 INJURY EPIDEMIOLOGY 3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will learn about the incidence, characteristics. risk Factors, populations at risk, control measures, and research methods related to traumatic injuries. The course includes lectures and presentations by faculty and students. Students will apply this knowledge throughout the course by completing assignments and analyzing injury data. The primary target audience for this course is doctoral students interested in injury epidemiology with a focus on environmental, agricultural and occupational health and safety. Pre-req: ENV 892, EPI 845, BIOS 810

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 904 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY 3 Credit Hours

Environmental policy is made and carried out by a diverse set of individuals, groups, and interests. Policy formation and implementation becomes a process of bargaining and negotiation. controlled partly by the character of the participants and partly by the nature of the arenas in which action takes place. In this course graduate students with an interest In environmental health and policy will apply several conceptual frameworks through case studies of federal, state and local action to environmental health Issues such as air pollution, wildlife, toxic substances. and provide an important view of the historical development of key environmental policies, including the Clean Water Act and the Clean Air Act. Pre-reqs: ENV 892

Typically Offered: SPRING

ENV 905 CLIMATE CHANGE AND HUMAN HEALTH 3 Credit Hours

This course Is designed for doctoral students in environmental health who have an interest in climate change. Any graduate student with an interest in climate change may take this course. This course explores the science or climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works, the use or models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate, and the connection between human activity and the current warming trend. The course also explores strategies to communicate the science of climate change to diverse stakeholders.

Prerequisite:  ENV 892, EPI 845, BIOS 808

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 908 THERMAL STRESS IN THE WORK ENVIRONMENT 3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will learn about the health effects, measurement, and control of health an cold stress in the work environment, and emerging technology related to smart clothes and wearable technology. Students will also learn how to develop a thermal stress program. The targeted audience will include doctoral students interested in occupational health, and professional students.

Prerequisite:  ENV 892; ENV 816

Typically Offered: SUMMER

ENV 909 OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE AND HEARING LOSS 3 Credit Hours

In this course, students will learn about the health effects, measurement, and control of occupational noise exposure, and emerging technology related to smart phones and wearable technology. Students will also learn how to provide hearing tests, read audiograms, and perform fit testing of ear plugs. The targeted audience include doctoral students interested in occupational health, profession students, and nursing students. Upon completion of this course, students may take an external examination administered by the Council for the Accreditation of Occupational Hearing Conversationists (CAOHC) to earn the credential of "Certified Occupational Hearing Conservationist (COHC."

Prerequisite:  ENV 892; BIOS 806

Typically Offered: SPRING

ENV 912 RISK ASSESSMENT AND TOXICOLOGY 3 Credit Hours

Human health risk assessment is the process of analyzing information to determine whether an environmental hazard might cause harm to exposed persons. This course is designed for doctoral students interested in the environment and toxicology. It is opened to any graduate or professional student Major topics to be covered include the EPA risk assessment model, and risk assessment of air, water, and food pollutants. Pre-reqs: ENV 892, ENV 888

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 913 ENVIRONMENTAL PATHOLOGY 3 Credit Hours

This course will enable students to understand the impact of environmental exposures on the organ and tissue injury responsible for human disease. The environmental exposures covered in the course will consist of the subject areas of air pollution, pneumoconiosis, chemical and drug exposures, and Pre-req: ENV 892, ENV 888

Typically Offered: SPRING

ENV 914 CHEMICAL CARCINOGENESIS 3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to prepare the graduate student, professional student, or fellow to evaluate the effects of chemical carcinogens, and conduct cancer-related research. Major topics to be covered include chemical carcinogens, multistep carcinogenesis, biomonitoring of human exposure, and chemoprevention of cancer. In this course students will learn about the characteriistics of chemical carcinogens, how they cause cancer, the role of oxidative stress and other biological factors in carcinogenesis, various model systems for investigating carcinogens. Strategies to prevent cancer by chemoprevention will also be discussed. This course will provide students with tools to evaluate environmental carcinogens, conduct research to understand their action and/or explore chemoprevention of various types of cancer.

Prerequisite:  ENV 888 or equivalent

Typically Offered: SPRING

ENV 950 ADVANCED TOXICOLOGY 3 Credit Hours

This course deals with the adverse effects of chemicals on biological systems. Physiological and biochemical mechanisms of toxicity at the cellular and subcellular levels will be emphasized.

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor and ENV 888 or equivalent.

Cross List: PHSC 950

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 958 EPIDEMIOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF HEALTHCARE DATA 3 Credit Hours

This course is designed for graduate and health professions students interested in analyzing healthcare data for epidemiologic and clinical research. Students will learn the unique challenges and opportunities of working with insurance claims data, electronic health records, national surveys and national registries. Students will also learn to use Geographic Information System (GIS) approaches to link social determinants of health and clinical outcomes. Students will practice their skills by performing hands-on analyses of simulated and actual research data. Upon completion of this course, students should be equipped with the tools necessary to analyze healthcare data and apply the results to address health care and public health challenges.

Prerequisite:  BIOSTATISTICS I-BIOS 806, INTRO SAS PROGRAMMING-BIOS 810, Crosslisted: CPH 758

Typically Offered: FALL

ENV 970 SEMINAR 1 Credit Hour

Attendance at weekly seminars offered by the department/program, or other activities specific to the degree program (contact the program director for more information).

Typically Offered: FALL/SPR

ENV 996 DIRECTED READINGS AND RESEARCH 1-9 Credit Hours

This course is specific to doctoral level work in the College of Public Health. Content of this independent study may include research other than dissertation, directed readings, and other study of a doctoral level all under the supervision of a graduate faculty member.

Prerequisite:  Doctoral student status and program permission.

Typically Offered: FALL/SP/SU

ENV 999 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION 1-9 Credit Hours

Independent student research related to the PhD dissertation. This course may be utilized before or after successful completion of the comprehensive exam.

Typically Offered: FALL/SP/SU